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Book Description

An authoritative guide to the various systems related to navigation, control, and other instrumentation used in a typical aircraft

Aircraft Systems offers an examination of the most recent developments in aviation as it relates to instruments, radio navigation, and communication. Written by a noted authority in the field, the text includes in-depth descriptions of traditional systems, reviews the latest developments, as well as gives information on the technologies that are likely to emerge in the future. The author presents material on essential topics including instruments, radio propagation, communication, radio navigation, inertial navigation, and puts special emphasis on systems based on MEMS.

This vital resource also provides chapters on solid state gyroscopes, magnetic compass, propagation modes of radio waves, and format of GPS signals. Aircraft Systems is an accessible text that includes an investigation of primary and secondary radar, the structure of global navigation satellite systems, and more. This important text:

  • Contains a description of the historical development of the latest technological developments in aircraft instruments, communications and navigation
  • Gives several “interesting diversion” topics throughout the chapters that link the topics discussed to other developments in aerospace
  • Provides examples of instruments and navigation systems in actual use in cockpit photographs obtained during the authors work as a flight instructor
  • Includes numerous worked examples of relevant calculations throughout the text and a set of problems at the end of each chapter

Written for upper undergraduates in aerospace engineering and pilots in training, Aircraft Systems offers an essential guide to both the traditional and most current developments in aviation as it relates to instruments, radio navigation, and communication.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. 1 Historical Development
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 The Advent of Instrument Flight
    3. 1.3 Development of Flight Instruments Based on Air Pressure
    4. 1.4 Development of Flight Instruments Based on Gyroscopes
    5. 1.5 Development of Aircraft Voice Communications
    6. 1.6 Development of Aircraft Digital Communications
    7. 1.7 Development of Radio Navigation
    8. 1.8 Area and Global Navigation Systems
    9. 1.9 Development of Auto Flight Control Systems
    10. References
  3. 2 Pressure Instruments
    1. 2.1 Layers of the Atmosphere
    2. 2.2 The International Standard Atmosphere (ISA)
    3. 2.3 Nonstandard Atmospheres
    4. 2.4 Dynamic Pressure and the Bernoulli Equation
    5. 2.5 Definition of Sea Level and Elevation
    6. 2.6 Definition of Height, Altitude, and Flight Level
    7. 2.7 Pitot and Static Sources
    8. 2.8 Pressure Altimeter
    9. 2.9 Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI)
    10. 2.10 Airspeed Indicator
    11. 2.11 Mach Meter
    12. 2.12 OAT Probe
    13. 2.13 Pitot–Static Systems
    14. 2.14 Air Data Computer (ADC)
    15. Problems
    16. References
  4. 3 Gyroscopic and Magnetic Instruments
    1. 3.1 Mechanical Gyroscopes and Instruments
    2. 3.2 Solid‐State Gyroscopes
    3. 3.3 Magnetic Compass
    4. 3.4 Attitude Heading and Reference System (AHRS)
    5. 3.5 Sensor Fusion
    6. Problems
    7. References
  5. 4 Radio Propagation and Communication
    1. 4.1 Basic Properties of Radio Waves
    2. 4.2 Propagation of Radio Waves
    3. 4.3 Transmitters, Receivers, and Signal Modulation
    4. 4.4 Antennas
    5. 4.5 VHF Communications System
    6. 4.6 Long‐Range HF Communications System
    7. 4.7 Satellite Communications
    8. 4.8 Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS)
    9. Problems
    10. References
  6. 5 Primary and Secondary Radar
    1. 5.1 Primary Radar
    2. 5.2 Ground Radar
    3. 5.3 Airborne Weather Radar
    4. 5.4 Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR)
    5. 5.5 Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)
    6. 5.6 Radio Altimeter
    7. References
  7. 6 General Principles of Navigation
    1. 6.1 Coordinate Reference System for the Earth
    2. 6.2 Compass Heading, Variation, and Deviation
    3. 6.3 Aviation Charts
    4. 6.4 Non‐Sphericity of the Earth and the WGS84 Model
    5. 6.5 Navigation by Dead Reckoning
    6. Problems
    7. References
  8. 7 Short‐Range Radio Navigation
    1. 7.1 Automatic Direction Finder (ADF)
    2. 7.2 VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR)
    3. 7.3 Distance Measuring Equipment (DME)
    4. 7.4 Instrument Landing System (ILS)
    5. 7.5 Microwave Landing System (MLS)
    6. Problems
    7. References
  9. 8 Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)
    1. 8.1 Basic Principle of Satellite Navigation
    2. 8.2 The Constellation of Space Vehicles (SVs)
    3. 8.3 Transmissions by the GPS SVs
    4. 8.4 Control Segment
    5. 8.5 Sources of GPS Errors
    6. 8.6 Relativity Corrections Required for GPS
    7. 8.7 Augmentation Systems
    8. 8.8 GPS Cockpit Instrumentation
    9. 8.9 Spoofing, Meaconing, and Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Resilience
    10. Problems
    11. References
  10. 9 Inertial Navigation and Kalman Filtering
    1. 9.1 Basic Principle of Inertial Navigation
    2. 9.2 Gimbaled Systems
    3. 9.3 Strapdown Systems
    4. 9.4 Accelerations Not due to Changes in Aircraft Motion
    5. 9.5 Schüler Oscillations
    6. 9.6 Earth‐Loop Oscillations
    7. 9.7 Summary of Inertial Guidance Errors
    8. 9.8 Cockpit Instrumentation
    9. 9.9 Kalman Filter
    10. Problems
    11. References
  11. Appendix A: Radiation from Wire Antennas
    1. A. Static Electric Fields Produced by Static Charges
    2. B. Static Magnetic Fields Produced by Steady Currents
    3. C. Dynamic Electric and Magnetic Fields Produced by Time‐Dependent Charges and Currents
    4. D. Fields Produced by a Dynamic Infinitesimal Current Element (Hertzian Dipole)
  12. Appendix B: Theory of Transmission Lines and Waveguides
  13. Appendix C: Effective Aperture of a Receiving Antenna
  14. Appendix D: Acronyms
  15. Index
  16. End User License Agreement
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