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Book Description

Disorder and Public Concern Around Globalization examines the contrast between an idealized vision and a realistic view of globalization. Both are inscribed in the contemporary debate within political and economic theory. This opposition highlights the conditions under which wealth creation and equitable distribution can outweigh the mere diversion of value and deepening of inequalities.

This book shows how facts and ideas can explain the shape currently taken by globalization, the latest innovation of market economies. Still, the unpredictable path followed depends on the attitudes of entrepreneurs and capital holders who arbitrate between short- and long-term timescales, between value creation and rent collection: attitudes driven by the same organizations and institutions that shape markets, structure the social order and ensure the viability of the current transition.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Introduction
  3. 1 The New Transition
    1. 1.1. The world of yesterday
    2. 1.2. Toward an economy of supply
    3. 1.3. Withdrawal of the State
    4. 1.4. Idealized globalization
    5. 1.5. Between dream and reality
    6. 1.6. Viability in question
  4. 2 The Constraints of Innovation
    1. 2.1. A truly industrial world
    2. 2.2. Roundabout production
    3. 2.3. A creative destruction process
    4. 2.4. Coordination requirement
    5. 2.5. Coordination power
    6. 2.6. The shortcomings of globalization
  5. 3 Entrepreneurs at the Crossroads
    1. 3.1. The entrepreneur out of time
    2. 3.2. The entrepreneur, master of time
    3. 3.3. Market connections
    4. 3.4. Competition revisited
    5. 3.5. Between value creation and diversion
    6. 3.6. Globalized entrepreneurship
  6. 4 The Time of Finance
    1. 4.1. Idealized financial markets
    2. 4.2. A contrasted reality
    3. 4.3. Capital and commitment
    4. 4.4. Corporate value
    5. 4.5. Influence of the funding structure
    6. 4.6. The risk of financial decommitment
  7. 5 The Return of Inequalities and Rents
    1. 5.1. The false argument of technology
    2. 5.2. A weakened growth potential
    3. 5.3. The perverse effect of household debt
    4. 5.4. Toward a rent-seekers economy
    5. 5.5. Social order in question
    6. 5.6. The new segmentation
  8. 6 The State in View of the Globalization Challenge
    1. 6.1. Free trade in question
    2. 6.2. The illusory promise of structural reforms
    3. 6.3. The obsession with competitiveness
    4. 6.4. The dilemma of borders
    5. 6.5. The temporal coherence of public action
    6. 6.6. The institutional challenge
  9. 7 Liberalism Revisited
    1. 7.1. Trust and regulation
    2. 7.2. Classical and bastardized liberalism
    3. 7.3. The State and the common good
    4. 7.4. Liberal democracy
    5. 7.5. The challenge of globalization
    6. 7.6. An open and equitable society
  10. Conclusion
  11. References
  12. Index
  13. End User License Agreement
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