FIGURE 123: The main interface window of Fusion 360
parts that are the combination of many oher parts, and other cost-saving features.
RENDER
Once you have a 3D model, you can create photo-realistic images and animations based on your designs,
using life-life material libraries included in Fusion 360.
ANIMATION
Allows you to create moving animations of your 3D models to showcase how they work and what they do.
SIMULATION
Once a model is created, you can actually run simulations on the computer that will help to predict failure
scenarios for your objects...as long as you know the real-world forces that your objects will be subjected to.
Real world forces include: the direction in which stress is applied, if any faces of your object are “locked”
against other objects, static stress amount, if your object will be exposed to thermal / heat stresses, or if
your object might buckle under pressure.
MANUFACTURE
Fusion 360 will create full GCode tool paths for milling machines. Once you have a 3D model you can define
how you want your object milled and Fusion will create those toolpaths for you.
DRAWING
You can associate 2D drawings with your models for patent drawing purposes or to help shop-workers
manufacture your product. The drawings dynamically update as you change your model.
MOVEMENT BOX
FIGURE 124: Selected plane in Fusion 360
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FIGURE 123: The main interface window of Fusion 360
parts that are the combination of many oher parts, and other cost-saving features.
RENDER
Once you have a 3D model, you can create photo-realistic images and animations based on your designs,
using life-life material libraries included in Fusion 360.
ANIMATION
Allows you to create moving animations of your 3D models to showcase how they work and what they do.
SIMULATION
Once a model is created, you can actually run simulations on the computer that will help to predict failure
scenarios for your objects...as long as you know the real-world forces that your objects will be subjected to.
Real world forces include: the direction in which stress is applied, if any faces of your object are “locked”
against other objects, static stress amount, if your object will be exposed to thermal / heat stresses, or if
your object might buckle under pressure.
MANUFACTURE
Fusion 360 will create full GCode tool paths for milling machines. Once you have a 3D model you can define
how you want your object milled and Fusion will create those toolpaths for you.
DRAWING
You can associate 2D drawings with your models for patent drawing purposes or to help shop-workers
manufacture your product. The drawings dynamically update as you change your model.
MOVEMENT BOX
Also, on the top right of the screen, there is a small “view cube.” This cube can be click-dragged and clicked
on to rotate your model if you forget how to rotate the model using the keyboard shortcuts.
Now that you’ve downloaded Fusion 360 and taken a brief tour of the features, it’s time to try it out.
MAKING A RING IN FUSION 360
In this tutorial you will be designing a ring that could be 3D printed either at home or through an online
service bureau. The steps can be followed precisely, or you can get creative with some of the sculpting func-
tions and add your own features. It’s really up to you!
Start by creating the band of the ring:
Make sure you are in the “Design” environment, and the “Solid” tab in the top-left drop down box and in the
ribbon, respectively.
The very first icon in the ribbon is a sheet of paper with a pencil and a “+” symbol. That is the “Create
Sketch” tool. Click that icon. Your screen will look like Figure 12-4. As you move your mouse around the
screen, Fusion 360 will ask you what “plane” you want to create that new sketch on.
Select the bottom plane.Now you are in Sketching mode.
In the top ribbon click the “Center Diameter Circle” as shown in Figure 12-5.
We are creating a jewelry ring. For the benefit of this tutorial (and because we want to make something truly
custom) we measured a family member’s ring finger diameter and found their finger to be 17.3mm wide.
FIGURE 124: Selected plane in Fusion 360 FIGURE 125: In the Sketch mode, choose Circle and Center
Diameter Circle
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Click on the dot that marks the center point of the
modeling surface (where the red and green lines
converge). As you move your mouse a circle will
follow your mouse showing the diameter of the
circle, as shown in Figure 12-6.
Before you click the button on your mouse, type 17.3
as shown in Figure 12-7. Then press Enter twice.
That’s all you need for the circle at this point so click
“Finish Sketch” in the top right of the menu bar to
get back to the main modeling environment.
Now that we have a base circle, let’s create some
3D geometry.
Click the small arrow in the top ribbon next to the
word “Create” and select Pipe as shown in Figure
12-8.
Click the edge of the circle. A 3D model will be gen-
erated and a menu will pop up as shown in Figure
12-9.
Select the following settings in the pop-up menu:
Set both Distance settings to 1.
Change the Section Size to 1 and then click OK.
You just made a simple ring with a 1mm-thick
cross-section, as shown in Figure 12-10.
But wait!
Let’s think through the measurements of this
model. Remember that you created a band to fit a
specifically measured distance of a 17.3mm wide
interior diameter. But we had you create a 1mm pipe
on the centerline, which extends inward by .5mm
FIGURE 126: Drawing a circle with specific dimensions
FIGURE 127: A sketch circle with a diameter of 17.3mm
FIGURE 128: Selection of Pipe option under the Create icon
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and outward by .5mm. That essentially takes away
.5mm from the inside, on both sides (removing a
total of 1mm). Now the interior diameter is actually
16.3mm! If you printed this ring, it would be 1mm too
small! Always conduct a logical “walkthrough” of
your steps to see if they make sense.
Never fear, it is easy to fix these things in a paramet-
ric modeling program.
At the bottom of your screen you will find a “history”
of all of the actions you took. Do you see the initial
sketch there, as well as a pipe command? Let’s go in
and edit that sketch.
Double-click the first Sketch icon on the bottom
left of the screen, just to the right of the Play com-
mands, as shown in Figure 12-11. This will bring you
back into the initial sketch you made.
To fix the model and make it larger, double-click the
17.3” number and edit it. You can also use arith-
metic operations in there as well! It is valid to type
either “17.3+1” or “18.3”.
FIGURE 129: A 3D pipe appears with a menu option
FIGURE 1210: The completed band of the ring
FIGURE 1211: Arrow showing the “history” that is being built as
you work in Fusion 360. Double-clicking any item will allow you to
change that item.
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Change “17.3” to “18.3” either by directly typing that number in, then press Enter, or by entering the addition
formula as shown in Figure 12-12.
You will now be left with a circle that is 18.3mm in diameter. Figure 12-13 shows a close-up view of the new
value of the diameter.
Click Finish Sketch to return to the main environment.Notice your ring tube updated in the background to
18.3mm in diameter, but the pipe thickness is still 1mm. The effective inner size is now 17.3mm, which is
what we wanted.
ADDING AN EMBELLISHMENT TO THE RING
Now, let’s put a topper on that ring to make it more interesting! Click the purple grid-box in the top ribbon
with a hover-over label of “Create Form” to enter into Sculpting mode as shown in Figure 12-14.
After entering into Sculpting/Form mode, click the top leftmost shape that looks like a 4 x 4 x 4 cube with
rounded edges.
Click the same plane as you did before to create a cube on the bottom plane. In order to better see where
to place the cube, find the “view cube” on the top right of the screen and click on “Top” to reorient your view
to the top. Then, place the cube somewhere around the “top” of the ring, by clicking in the general vicinity of
the shaded-out ring, as shown in Figure 12-15.
FIGURE 1212: In the sketch environment, double-clicking the
diameter number allows for editing. The field entry now reads
17.3+1.
FIGURE 1213: Close-up view of changed diameter
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