Appendix . Color Plate

Screen shot of the SolidWorks application, showing a jigsaw rendered with OpenGL shaders to simulate a chrome body, galvanized steel housing, and cast iron blade. (Courtesy of SolidWorks Corporation)

Figure 1. Screen shot of the SolidWorks application, showing a jigsaw rendered with OpenGL shaders to simulate a chrome body, galvanized steel housing, and cast iron blade. (Courtesy of SolidWorks Corporation)

Screen shots illustrating realistic material shaders developed by LightWork Design. Upper-left and lower-left images use complex OpenGL shaders for accurately visualizing real-world GE Plastics materials. Upper-right image illustrates the real-world visualization of Milliken carpets using the LightWorks Archive (LWA) format. Lower-right image illustrates high-quality lighting created using materials in the LWA format. LightWork Design provides the shaders, materials, and information about the LWA format at http://www.lightworks-user.com. (Created using the LightWorks rendering engine. Copyright LightWork Design)

Figure 2. Screen shots illustrating realistic material shaders developed by LightWork Design. Upper-left and lower-left images use complex OpenGL shaders for accurately visualizing real-world GE Plastics materials. Upper-right image illustrates the real-world visualization of Milliken carpets using the LightWorks Archive (LWA) format. Lower-right image illustrates high-quality lighting created using materials in the LWA format. LightWork Design provides the shaders, materials, and information about the LWA format at http://www.lightworks-user.com. (Created using the LightWorks rendering engine. Copyright LightWork Design)

A full-color image of Earth that is used as a texture map for the shader discussed in Section 10.2. (Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Figure 3. A full-color image of Earth that is used as a texture map for the shader discussed in Section 10.2. (Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

“Daytime” texture map used in the fragment shader described in Section 10.3. (Blue Marble images by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Figure 4. “Daytime” texture map used in the fragment shader described in Section 10.3. (Blue Marble images by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

“Nighttime” texture map used in the fragment shader described in Section 10.3. (Blue Marble images by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Figure 5. “Nighttime” texture map used in the fragment shader described in Section 10.3. (Blue Marble images by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Earth image texture mapped onto a sphere using the fragment shader described in Section 10.2. (3Dlabs, Inc./Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Figure 6. Earth image texture mapped onto a sphere using the fragment shader described in Section 10.2. (3Dlabs, Inc./Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

As the world turns—daytime, dawn, and nighttime views of Earth, rendered by the shaders discussed in Section 10.3. (3Dlabs, Inc./Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Figure 7. As the world turns—daytime, dawn, and nighttime views of Earth, rendered by the shaders discussed in Section 10.3. (3Dlabs, Inc./Blue Marble image by Reto Stöckli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Different glyphs applied to a cube using the glyph bombing shader described in Section 10.6. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 8. Different glyphs applied to a cube using the glyph bombing shader described in Section 10.6. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

An equirectangular (or latlong) texture map of Old Town Square, Fort Collins, Colorado. This image is used as the environment map for the shader presented in Section 10.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 9. An equirectangular (or latlong) texture map of Old Town Square, Fort Collins, Colorado. This image is used as the environment map for the shader presented in Section 10.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Left: Light probe image of Old Town Square, Fort Collins, Colorado. Middle: Cube map version of the Old Town Square light probe image. Right: Diffuse (top) and specular (bottom, Phong exponent = 50) environment maps created with HDRshop. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 10. Left: Light probe image of Old Town Square, Fort Collins, Colorado. Middle: Cube map version of the Old Town Square light probe image. Right: Diffuse (top) and specular (bottom, Phong exponent = 50) environment maps created with HDRshop. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Environment mapped shader examples. Left: The cube map shown in Color Plate 10 is used together with the environment mapping shaders discussed in Section 10.4. Right: Environment mapping a mirror-like surface with procedural bumps using the environment map shown in Color Plate 9. The bumps are applied using the technique described in Section 11.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 11. Environment mapped shader examples. Left: The cube map shown in Color Plate 10 is used together with the environment mapping shaders discussed in Section 10.4. Right: Environment mapping a mirror-like surface with procedural bumps using the environment map shown in Color Plate 9. The bumps are applied using the technique described in Section 11.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Screen shot of the RenderMonkey IDE user interface. The shader that is procedurally generating a Julia set on the surface of the elephant is shown in the source code window. Color selection tools and user interface elements for manipulating user-defined uniform variables are also shown.

Figure 12. Screen shot of the RenderMonkey IDE user interface. The shader that is procedurally generating a Julia set on the surface of the elephant is shown in the source code window. Color selection tools and user interface elements for manipulating user-defined uniform variables are also shown.

Intermediate results from the toy ball shader described in Section 11.2. In (A), red is applied to the procedurally defined star pattern and yellow to the rest of the sphere. In (B), the blue stripe is added. In (C), diffuse lighting is applied. In (D), the analytically defined normal is used to apply a specular highlight. (Courtesy of ATI Research, Inc.)

Figure 13. Intermediate results from the toy ball shader described in Section 11.2. In (A), red is applied to the procedurally defined star pattern and yellow to the rest of the sphere. In (B), the blue stripe is added. In (C), diffuse lighting is applied. In (D), the analytically defined normal is used to apply a specular highlight. (Courtesy of ATI Research, Inc.)

The lattice shader presented in Section 11.3 is applied to the cow model. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 14. The lattice shader presented in Section 11.3 is applied to the cow model. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A simple box and a torus that have been bump-mapped using the procedural method described in Section 11.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 15. A simple box and a torus that have been bump-mapped using the procedural method described in Section 11.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A normal map (left) and the rendered result on a simple box and a sphere using the techniques described in Section 11.4.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 16. A normal map (left) and the rendered result on a simple box and a sphere using the techniques described in Section 11.4.4. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

The reflection/refraction shader from Section 14.1 used to render a model with chromatic aberration (middle) and without (left). On the middle image, notice the color fringing on the knees, chest, and tops of the arms. On the right, three orientations of an object rendered with the diffraction shader from Section 14.2. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 17. The reflection/refraction shader from Section 14.1 used to render a model with chromatic aberration (middle) and without (left). On the middle image, notice the color fringing on the knees, chest, and tops of the arms. On the right, three orientations of an object rendered with the diffraction shader from Section 14.2. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

The image-based lighting shader described in Section 12.2 can produce a variety of effects using the Old Town Square diffuse and specular environment maps shown in Color Plate 9. Left: BaseColor set to (1.0, 1.0, 1.0), SpecularPercent is 0, and DiffusePercent is 1.0. Middle: BaseColor is set to (0, 0, 0), SpecularPercent is set to 1.0, and DiffusePercent is set to 0. Right: BaseColor is set to (0.35, 0.29, 0.09), SpecularPercent is set to 0.75, and DiffusePercent is set to 0.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 18. The image-based lighting shader described in Section 12.2 can produce a variety of effects using the Old Town Square diffuse and specular environment maps shown in Color Plate 9. Left: BaseColor set to (1.0, 1.0, 1.0), SpecularPercent is 0, and DiffusePercent is 1.0. Middle: BaseColor is set to (0, 0, 0), SpecularPercent is set to 1.0, and DiffusePercent is set to 0. Right: BaseColor is set to (0.35, 0.29, 0.09), SpecularPercent is set to 0.75, and DiffusePercent is set to 0.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

The spherical harmonics lighting shader described in Section 12.3 is used as the sole lighting for a model with a base color of white (RGB=1.0, 1.0, 1.0). The coefficients from Table 12.1 that are used to create these images are from left: Old Town Square, Grace Cathedral, Galileo’s Tomb, Campus Sunset, and St. Peter’s Basilica. Ambient occlusion factors are also applied (see Section 13.1). (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 19. The spherical harmonics lighting shader described in Section 12.3 is used as the sole lighting for a model with a base color of white (RGB=1.0, 1.0, 1.0). The coefficients from Table 12.1 that are used to create these images are from left: Old Town Square, Grace Cathedral, Galileo’s Tomb, Campus Sunset, and St. Peter’s Basilica. Ambient occlusion factors are also applied (see Section 13.1). (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Effects of the überlight shader (see Section 12.4) and a user interface for manipulating its controls. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 20. Effects of the überlight shader (see Section 12.4) and a user interface for manipulating its controls. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A comparison of some of the lighting models described in Chapter 12 and Chapter 13. The model uses a base color of white (RGB=1.0, 1.0, 1.0) to emphasize areas of light and shadow. (A) uses fixed functionality lighting with a light above and to the right of the model. (B) uses fixed functionality with a light directly above the model. These two images illustrate the difficulties with the traditional lighting model. Detail is lost in areas of shadow. (C) multiplies the ambient occlusion value by the model color to achieve quite pleasing results. (D) illustrates hemisphere lighting while (G) illustrates hemisphere lighting plus ambient occlusion. (E) illustrates spherical harmonic lighting using the Old Town Square coefficients, while (H) uses spherical harmonic lighting plus ambient occlusion. (F) is simple diffuse lighting attenuated by the ambient occlusion factor. (I) uses ambient occlusion and the bent normal to access the Old Town Square environment map to determine the color of the light reaching the surface. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 21. A comparison of some of the lighting models described in Chapter 12 and Chapter 13. The model uses a base color of white (RGB=1.0, 1.0, 1.0) to emphasize areas of light and shadow. (A) uses fixed functionality lighting with a light above and to the right of the model. (B) uses fixed functionality with a light directly above the model. These two images illustrate the difficulties with the traditional lighting model. Detail is lost in areas of shadow. (C) multiplies the ambient occlusion value by the model color to achieve quite pleasing results. (D) illustrates hemisphere lighting while (G) illustrates hemisphere lighting plus ambient occlusion. (E) illustrates spherical harmonic lighting using the Old Town Square coefficients, while (H) uses spherical harmonic lighting plus ambient occlusion. (F) is simple diffuse lighting attenuated by the ambient occlusion factor. (I) uses ambient occlusion and the bent normal to access the Old Town Square environment map to determine the color of the light reaching the surface. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Comparing the shadow-generation techniques described in Section 13.2. From left, accessing the shadow map with one sample per pixel, with four samples per pixel, with four dithered samples per pixel, and with 16 samples per pixel. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 22. Comparing the shadow-generation techniques described in Section 13.2. From left, accessing the shadow map with one sample per pixel, with four samples per pixel, with four dithered samples per pixel, and with 16 samples per pixel. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Rolled Brass ρ d,s = 0.100, 0.330 α x,y = 0.050,0.160 color = 1.0, 0.62, 0.31

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Plastic Laminate ρ d,s = 0.670, 0.070 α x,y = 0.092,0.092 color = 0., 45, 0.54, 1.0 scale factors = 1.0, 50.0, 2.0

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Semi-Gloss Paint, Rolled ρ d,s = 0.450, 0.048 α x,y = 0.045, 0.068 color = 0., 45, 0.54, 1.0 scale factors = 1.0, 20.0, 10.0

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Lightly Brushed Aluminum ρ d,s = 0.150, 0.190 α x,y = 0.088,0.130 color = 1.0, 0.99, 1.0 scale factors = 2.0, 2.0, 2.0

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

White Ceramic Tile ρ d,s = 0.700, 0.050 α x,y = 0.071,0.071 color = 1.0, 1.0, 1.0 scale factors = 1.0, 10.0, 10.0

A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Gloss Paint, Rolled ρ d,s = 0.450, 0.059 α x,y = 0.054, 0.080 color = 0., 45, 0.54, 1.0 scale factors = 1.0, 20.0, 10.0

Figure 23. A variety of materials rendered with Ward’s BRDF model (see Section 14.3) and his measured/fitted material parameters. Note the difference in the shapes of the specular highlights, particularly on the knob of the teapot. The metals and paints exhibit anisotropic reflection while the plastic and tile materials are isotropic. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Teapots rendered with noise shaders, as described in Chapter 15. Clockwise from upper left: a cloud shader that sums four octaves of noise and uses a blue-to-white color gradient to code the result; a sun surface shader that uses the absolute value function to introduce discontinuities (turbulence); a granite shader that uses a single high-frequency noise value to modulate between white and black; a marble shader that uses noise to modulate a sine function to produce alternating “veins” of color. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 24. Teapots rendered with noise shaders, as described in Chapter 15. Clockwise from upper left: a cloud shader that sums four octaves of noise and uses a blue-to-white color gradient to code the result; a sun surface shader that uses the absolute value function to introduce discontinuities (turbulence); a granite shader that uses a single high-frequency noise value to modulate between white and black; a marble shader that uses noise to modulate a sine function to produce alternating “veins” of color. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A bust of Beethoven rendered with the wood shader described in Section 15.7. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 25. A bust of Beethoven rendered with the wood shader described in Section 15.7. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Noise tile sets from the RealWorldz demo (see Section 20.3.2), (A) original tiles, (B) random offsets, (C) tile + offset, (D) resulting pseudorandom tile set. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 26. Noise tile sets from the RealWorldz demo (see Section 20.3.2), (A) original tiles, (B) random offsets, (C) tile + offset, (D) resulting pseudorandom tile set. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Left: The difference between a conventional texture map (lower left) and a polynomial texture map (PTM) (upper right). The conventional texture looks flat and unrealistic as the light source is moved, while the PTM faithfully reproduces changing specular highlights and self-shadowing. Right: A torus rendered using the BRDF PTM shaders described in Section 14.4. Although the paint is basically black, note the change in the highlight color (from bluish-purple in the back to reddish-brown in the front) as the reflection angle changes. (© Copyright 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P., Reproduced with Permission)

Figure 27. Left: The difference between a conventional texture map (lower left) and a polynomial texture map (PTM) (upper right). The conventional texture looks flat and unrealistic as the light source is moved, while the PTM faithfully reproduces changing specular highlights and self-shadowing. Right: A torus rendered using the BRDF PTM shaders described in Section 14.4. Although the paint is basically black, note the change in the highlight color (from bluish-purple in the back to reddish-brown in the front) as the reflection angle changes. (© Copyright 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P., Reproduced with Permission)

Gooch shading applied to three objects (see Section 18.2). Background color (gray), warm color (yellow), and cool color (blue) are chosen in order so that they do not impede the clarity of the outline color (black) or highlight color (white). Details are still visible in this rendering that would be lost in shadow using traditional shading. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 28. Gooch shading applied to three objects (see Section 18.2). Background color (gray), warm color (yellow), and cool color (blue) are chosen in order so that they do not impede the clarity of the outline color (black) or highlight color (white). Details are still visible in this rendering that would be lost in shadow using traditional shading. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Several frames from the animated sequence produced by the wobble shader described in Section 16.8. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 29. Several frames from the animated sequence produced by the wobble shader described in Section 16.8. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Results of the image brightness shader discussed in Section 19.5.1 with alpha equal to 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 from left to right. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Figure 30. Results of the image brightness shader discussed in Section 19.5.1 with alpha equal to 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 from left to right. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Results of the image contrast shader discussed in Section 19.5.2 with alpha equal to 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 from left to right. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Figure 31. Results of the image contrast shader discussed in Section 19.5.2 with alpha equal to 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 from left to right. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Results of the image saturation shader discussed in Section 19.5.3 with alpha equal to 0.0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 from left to right. The image with alpha = 0.0 is the same as the unmodified target image. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Figure 32. Results of the image saturation shader discussed in Section 19.5.3 with alpha equal to 0.0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 from left to right. The image with alpha = 0.0 is the same as the unmodified target image. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Results of the image sharpness shader discussed in Section 19.5.4 with alpha equal to 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 from left to right. The image with alpha = 0.0 is the same as the unmodified target image. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Figure 33. Results of the image sharpness shader discussed in Section 19.5.4 with alpha equal to 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 from left to right. The image with alpha = 0.0 is the same as the unmodified target image. The image with alpha = 1.0 is the same as the unmodified source image.

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Base Image

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Blend Image

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Darken

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Multiply

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Color Burn

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Dissolve, 50% Opacity

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Lighten

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Screen

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Color Dodge

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Add

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Overlay

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Soft Light

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Hard Light

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Normal, 50% Opacity

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Difference

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Exclusion

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Inverse Difference

Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Subtract

Figure 34. Shaders that implement various blend modes, as described in Section 19.6.

Brick shader with and without antialiasing. On the left, the results of the brick shader presented in Chapter 6. On the right, results of antialiasing by analytic integration using the brick shader described in Section 17.4.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 35. Brick shader with and without antialiasing. On the left, the results of the brick shader presented in Chapter 6. On the right, results of antialiasing by analytic integration using the brick shader described in Section 17.4.5. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(A) AltGrad maps for AlienRockArt, Snow, and DragonRidges

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(B) Four texture slices for DragonRidges

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(C) Two-component terrain on the Meran world

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(D) Resulting terrain on DragonRidges world

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(E) Overhanging terrain on AlienRockArt world

Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(F) Resulting snow and rock covering on Snow planet

Figure 36. Textures used and final results from the RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(A) Atmospheric extinction

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(B) Atmospheric inscatter

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(C) Atmospheric final result

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(D) Photo of real clouds

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(E) Dense, low-lying fog

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(F) Cloud alpha/normal

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(G) Self-shadowing of clouds

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(H) Edge lighting of clouds

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(I) Sky color texture

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(J) Atmosphere density texture

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(K) Sun glare with colored halo

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(L) Sky color texture for (K)

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(M-T) Various views of the sky from the DragonRidges planet using the sky color texture in (I) and density texture in (J)

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(U) Terrain before ocean composite

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(V) Reflection image

Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

(W) Terrain after reflection composite

Figure 37. Example images from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo described in Chapter 20. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

A variety of screen shots from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo. Everything in this demo is generated procedurally using shaders written in the OpenGL Shading Language. This includes the planets themselves, the terrain, atmosphere, clouds, plants, oceans, and rock formations. Planets are modeled as mathematical spheres, not height fields. These scenes are all rendered at interactive rates on current generation graphics hardware. See Chapter 20 for details. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

Figure 38. A variety of screen shots from the 3Dlabs RealWorldz demo. Everything in this demo is generated procedurally using shaders written in the OpenGL Shading Language. This includes the planets themselves, the terrain, atmosphere, clouds, plants, oceans, and rock formations. Planets are modeled as mathematical spheres, not height fields. These scenes are all rendered at interactive rates on current generation graphics hardware. See Chapter 20 for details. (3Dlabs, Inc.)

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